Women Who Advocate for Diversity, Equity, Inclusion and Accessibility in the Federal Government

Throughout history and worldwide, countless women have championed diversity, equity, inclusion, and accessibility (DEIA), making significant contributions to creating a more just and equitable society.

In closing out the 2024 celebration of National Women’s History Month, which honors women who advocate for diversity, equity and inclusion, meet the following individuals of Federally Employed Women (FEW) who promote DEIA every day. They are:

Each discusses why DEIA is critical for women in the Federal government and the overall workplace and how the Federal government is boosting its DEIA efforts.

Q: Why is DEIA critical for women in the Federal government and the workplace in general?

A: Golubski – It’s critical to have a safe place, including DEIA initiatives for women in the workforce, both within the Federal sectors and in general, to grow personally and professionally. 

Here are leading DEIA initiatives advantages:

  • Ensure equal representatives. As women are capable of ALL things, breaking down barriers and biases enhances organizations and creates a level playing field where women can actively participate, contribute and advance in their careers. Increased representation of women improves diversity and brings broader experiences, ideas and insights to organizations and the implemented decision processes.
  • Challenge and overcome gender bias and stereotypes. By fostering an inclusive culture that values diverse perspectives and talents, organizations can create an environment where women’s skills and potential are recognized and utilized. Overcoming gender bias promotes fairness and a more inclusive and respectful workplace.
  • Support and retain women in their careers. According to a recent “Women in the Workplace” report, nine in 10 women ages 30 and under want to be promoted to the next level, and three in four aspire to become senior leaders. Supporting women in their careers is essential in helping the leaders of tomorrow and the general future, resulting in an equitable and inclusive workforce.

A: Keakalaulono Zimmerman – DEIA is critical for women because it’s often women who are excluded from opportunities to work in certain fields, experience discrimination while on the job, and face barriers in hiring, recruitment and retention. This adversely impacts performance awards, recognition and promotions.

What affects your pay now affects how comfortable you’ll be in your future retirement. For example, average lifetime earnings for women are substantially lower due to a number of factors. These include gender inequality, constraints, and biases that limit promotion opportunities, training, career advancement, career interruption for family caregiving, or unequal pay for equal work.

The Executive Order on DEIA states that the Federal government, as the nation’s largest employer, must be a model for diversity, equity, inclusion and accessibility, where all employees are treated with dignity and respect. Also, recruit, hire, develop, promote and retain its nation’s talent, removing barriers to equal opportunity. The Federal government should reflect America’s diversity. Workplaces that demonstrate a diverse, equitable, inclusive and accessible workplace yield higher-performing organizations.

DEIA is critical for women in the Federal government, and women are critical for the Federal government to succeed at its best, with a diversity of ideas, people and talent.

Q: How is the Federal government improving DEIA efforts?

A: Golubski – Based on my experiences under the Biden Administration, there have been many efforts to improve DEIA efforts. Some include promoting more women to senior positions and more women leading the way in the workforce.

A: Keakalaulono Zimmerman – Early in my career with the Federal government, I knew of military women who, along with their spouses, planned to have both a family and a career. However, once she became pregnant, she was required to be involuntarily separated from military duty.

This kept women from meeting the required years of active service to reach their full retirement and retired pay. Consequently, they couldn’t reap the lifelong financial benefits afforded male service members. The Seabee Battalions weren’t yet integrated with women, which restricted them from gaining the technical experience in the field that they needed to achieve a higher degree of proficiency. This also hampered them from being promoted to leadership positions. 

The Department of Defense also had the Risk Rule, which barred women from the risk of hostile fire, capture or direct combat, effectively keeping women from working in certain fields in the military.

As civilian women, they were often the “only” or the “few.” The term “only” refers to one woman working in a traditionally masculine function (e.g., firefighter, police officer, tradesperson, etc.), which commands a higher salary. The non-supervisory information technology and engineering fields usually went up to GS-12, but there were “few” women in these fields.

Most jobs for civilian women were in the secretarial and clerical fields. These jobs were usually GS-1, 2 and 3. The highest secretarial position on our base was GS-8 for the Captain’s secretary. The highest-graded woman in the blue-collar on our base was WG-10. Most were WG-5 and below.

When one of my colleagues applied for a coveted job, she was in her third trimester of pregnancy. She asked during her interview if that would hurt her chances of being selected, as she would be taking maternity leave. There wasn’t maternity leave at the time, so you had to take your sick leave. If you were still early in your career, you most likely hadn’t accrued enough sick leave. If you borrowed sick leave, it would take two years to pay it back. So, if your family members got ill, you had to take annual leave.

Instances of sexual harassment were unfortunately common, and many buildings at base lacked ramps and elevators for accessibility. Often, recruitment efforts seeking people with disabilities were insufficient.

Based on my experiences since then, the Federal government has improved its DEIA efforts. Anyone can go online and see the various pay scales. All employees are required to get annual sexual harassment prevention training. Pregnant women can work in the military and civilian workforce and continue their careers with new leave options and accommodations for breastfeeding mothers. 

The U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC) is in place, so agencies can use the Management Directive MD-715 to help them identify barriers to equal opportunity. Federal government employees can also track and report to improve their recruiting, hiring and promoting in line with a model equal opportunity employment program

If agencies don’t comply with EEOC guidance and mandates, individuals may file a complaint to seek resolution. Adaptive and assistive tools and technologies are available to accommodate employees with disabilities.

While improvements have been made, issues remain. Women still face discrimination and are underrepresented in higher pay grades and tiers of the Federal government, as per recent reports. There are additional obstacles due to intersecting barriers experienced by women from more than one underserved community. One example is being a woman and a woman of color.

So, is there more to be done? Yes, there is.

Q: What are your passion projects and accomplishments of which you’re particularly proud?

A: Golubski – I’m proud to serve as the Vice President of Diversity and Special Assistant to the President for People with Disabilities. It’s a passion project to provide support and a more inclusive, equitable workforce for women currently in their roles and to make way for and build a pathway forward for the women behind us.

A: Keakalaulono Zimmerman – I’m honored to have worked with management in the Federal government to develop on-the-job training, which ultimately allowed employees at a lower level grade to be able to later qualify for ladder positions and be promoted from a GS-7 to GS-12. Likewise, on a similar program in blue collar for on-the-job training.

I established the Joyce W. Stewart Memorial Award, an equal employment opportunity (EEO) award at my base. The command used it for more than 25 years to acknowledge the accomplishments of military, civilians, contractors, individuals, supervisors, managers and teams in applying the principles of equal and fair treatment. This created a model EEO program, thereby removing barriers and providing avenues for career advancement and mentorship.

Additionally, I established the JUDE Scholarship, which supplies mentoring and scholarship money for a local high school. This has benefited many young women who were the first in their families to attend a university.

I’m the proud recipient of the Allie Latimer Award, presented at the 2023 FEW National Training Program (NTP). The award recognizes action and leadership resulting in service to FEW, and extraordinary grassroots effort working to achieve FEW’s mission. I was especially moved because of who the award represented, the FEW Founder Dr. Allie Latimer.

This was a full circle moment for me because I remember meeting Dr. Allie Latimer at a FEW NTP years earlier. That is another great aspect of the NTP. It’s an opportunity to meet women of history, women of destiny and women of strength. So much knowledge and wisdom at one event! The 55th FEW NTP is scheduled for August 4 – 8, 2024, at the Hilton Chicago in Chicago, Illinois.

Q: What are your thoughts on the theme: Women Who Advocate for Equity, Diversity and Inclusion, and how does FEW fit into this picture?

A: Golubski – I love the theme because I believe it’s essential for women to lead the way with DEIA initiatives and learn from other like-minded women who are striving to break barriers for women inside and outside the Federal work sector.

FEW plays a vital role in advocating, as its mission is to “work to end sex and gender discrimination, to encourage diversity for the inclusion and equity in the workplace, and for the advancement and professional growth of women in the Federal service.” Not only is this part of the mission, but as the theme, FEW is actively pursuing this mission to share with others through the theme.

A: Keakalaulono Zimmerman – If we don’t advocate, who will? Working and advocating for DEIA is essential. Most people know what’s fair and right, but it doesn’t mean they’ll do either. Many women before us fought for these rights. We must continue the work so that these hard-fought rights don’t vanish.

Women will benefit from our advocacy, and the converse is true. Women will suffer in recruitment, retention, promotion, career advancement, finances, and issues that impact our work, our lives, and our families if we fail to advocate.

FEW is the good news of this story that fits into this picture. The organization offers advocacy, mentorship, and membership. Its foundational pillars are training, diversity, compliance, and legislation. FEW stays abreast of the latest legislative issues impacting women, children, and families, as well as other topics of concern to all government employees. Moreover, FEW connects with legislators to inform them of what’s important to its national membership.

For example, the FEW Southern California Gold Coast Chapter invited our congresswoman to speak with us. One of the women in the audience asked a question regarding paid parental leave for Federal government employees. The congresswoman was surprised that federal workers didn’t yet have that and had to take unpaid leave. She took it back to Washington, D.C., and that benefit is now available because of that interaction. It happened at the FEW chapter level because women advocated for other women, which benefited all Federal government employees.

On April 30 and May 1, 2024, attend the FEW Western Region Training Program, Women Who Advocate for Equity, Diversity, and Inclusion in Las Vegas, Nevada.

Q: Who is FEW?

A: FEW, a private, non-profit organization founded in 1968, is an advocacy group that works to improve the status of women employed by the Federal government. Membership is open to those who subscribe to the organization’s purposes and carry out its mission. Participation in FEW is not limited to women. Anyone concerned about discrimination based on sex and employment opportunities for women in the Federal government is welcome to join FEW. Get in touch to learn more. We’d love to hear from you.

5 Ways to Overcome Self-Love Challenges to Foster Personal Career Growth

Self-love plays a significant role in career growth, acting as a powerful engine fueling your professional journey. A self-love mindset empowers you to navigate career growth challenges with confidence, resilience and a focus on well-being—which can lead to tremendous career success and fulfillment.

In celebration of International Day of Self-Love, Victoria Icenhower, a self-love scientist, women’s empowerment coach and nationwide speaker, explores how a lack of self-love can stunt your career growth and how to overcome self-love challenges to foster personal career growth.

Role of Self-Love in Career Growth

Self-love is the foundation for personal well-being and professional success. The more we set our standards of worthiness, the stronger our relationship with ourselves becomes. Women often invest a lot of time and effort into assuming roles such as leader, wife, mother and entrepreneur to uphold expectations that aren’t in line with their worth. That’s on top of external relationships and personal and professional obligations.

When all those “boxes” are checked, women often forget themselves, which is the most important box to check because self-love enables us to:

  • Prioritize work-life balance and personal well-being.
  • Communicate demands with confidence.
  • Become resilient in the face of obstacles at work.
  • Make better decisions.
  • Find long-term satisfaction in our careers.

Lack of Self-Love Stunts Career Growth

A lack of self-love creates a barrier because there’s a state of mind that speaks to “not being good enough.” When this happens, comfort becomes the safest position, hindering future growth potential.

Since self-love is linked to promoting your worthiness and values, lacking it makes it harder for women to apply for promotions because they fear rejection or believe they’re unworthy. There can be neither career advancement nor job satisfaction while these barriers, also known as limiting beliefs, are present.

Without self-love, women are likelier to settle for unfavorable behaviors because they don’t respect their boundaries and feel like they have a purpose or sense of fulfillment in their profession. They’re also more likely to burn out. The comfort zone is not always the best zone.

Ways to Overcome Self-Love Challenges

Before we dive into ways to overcome self-love challenges, let’s review some of the top ones. Fear of failing is the most prevalent obstacle to self-love in women. It keeps you from taking chances and pursuing your dreams, lowering your self-confidence. Next is the fear of rejection and judgment. Fear of judgment creates an unwillingness to express oneself authentically.

These fears contribute to a common thread known as “people pleasers.” They have the mission of pleasing everyone for the sake of external validation. Regrettably, this makes establishing and maintaining healthy boundaries difficult, leading to over-commitment and disregarding one’s needs. When you neglect your own needs, you’re discounting proper rest, nutrition and pleasure.

Next, negative self-talk and constant self-criticism erode your self-esteem, making it impossible to believe you can achieve greatness. Playing the comparison game adds to this negative self-talk. Whether you’re passed over for a promotion or don’t get an appreciation for your job, comparing yourself to others can make you feel inadequate and diminish your self-worth, especially in the workplace.

The following are five ways to begin overcoming these challenges to foster personal career growth.

  1. Self-reflection and awareness: First and foremost, identify and understand your very own self-love challenges. Developing self-awareness is the first step toward fostering personal growth. The sooner you clarify your values and non-negotiables, the sooner you can end what’s holding you back and make changes.
  2. Positive affirmations: To combat negative self-talk, practice positive affirmations tailored to your professional achievements and capabilities. Affirming your worth and acknowledging accomplishments can reshape your self-perception positively. Failures translate as opportunities for learning versus just a failure.
  3. Work-life balance: Set aside time for the things that bring you the most joy, maintain a healthy sleep schedule and keep a close eye on your mental health. Balancing professional responsibilities with personal life contributes to overall satisfaction and fosters a positive self-image. When you feel good in your body, you feel good in your mind, and that’s expressed visually.
  4. Celebrations: Acknowledge and celebrate your achievements regularly. Recognizing accomplishments, both big and small, boosts morale and reinforces a positive self-perception. You start to build the mental affirmation of “I get to be here,” “I’m good enough” and “I’m doing the best I can.”
  5. Communicating your values: How would anyone know how to treat you? To maintain long term successful personal and professional relationships, it’s vital to set clear and specific expectations and communicate regularly. Your truth reflects your values. Be specific and set the tone for the relationships you want to experience.

The key to growth is through vulnerability. Overcoming societal expectations and gender roles in the workplace can be challenging and impact your role and confidence. All women must recognize that self-love is not a one-time achievement but an ongoing journey.

Embracing self-love requires patience, self-compassion and a commitment to personal growth. Be kind to yourself, celebrate your uniqueness and understand that your worth extends beyond professional accomplishments. Taking the time for self-care is not a luxury but a necessity for sustained success and fulfillment in your personal and professional life.

As federally employed women, fostering self-love is beneficial for personal well-being and a strategic investment in unlocking your full potential and achieving personal career growth.

Professional Skills and Training Resources

Federally Employed Women (FEW) membership offers premiere training on the national, regional and chapter levels. The focus is to help members strengthen their professional skills and acquire knowledge of career development and planning techniques. Additionally, FEW enhances members’ personal effectiveness and awareness of the broader issues that impact women. Get in touch to learn more. We’d love to hear from you.

Victoria Icenhower has empowered countless individuals to reclaim their confidence and embrace a life of authentic fulfillment. With a journey rooted in personal transformation, Icenhower has risen above the challenges of corporate burnout, battling boundaries and divorce and turning it into a catalyst for growth and empowerment. Drawing from her own experiences, Icenhower understands the profound impact of a healthy relationship with oneself on overall well-being and sexual empowerment. She has dedicated time to studying and developing transformative techniques and methodologies that blend the science of self-love and psychology, unlocking the secrets to lasting personal fulfillment, meaningful relationships and captivating confidence. Contact Victoria Icenhower for more resources and support at victoria.lotuslifestyle@gmail.com

Federal and Retirement Benefits: What You Need to Know in 2024

Every year, changes to federal and retirement benefits impact federally employed women. Examples can include Social Security amounts and cost of living (COLA) rates, to name a few. In 2024, there are specific modifications that present unique opportunities and challenges for women working for the government.

Staying informed on these changes is crucial to making informed decisions, protecting your financial well-being, navigating your career and contributing to the government workforce.

Nicole Sherwood at United Benefits provides pertinent information you need to know about federal and retirement benefits in 2024 and shares tips on meaningful ways federal employees can improve their current situation.

Key Information to Know

  • Supplemental Security Income (SSI): The maximum Federal SSI payment amounts rise with Social Security benefit cost-of-living increases. The latest such increase, 3.2 percent, became effective in January 2024. The monthly maximum Federal amounts for 2024 are $943 for an eligible individual, $1,415 for an eligible individual with an eligible spouse and $472 for an essential person. 
  • Wellness programs: Many agencies offer health and wellness programs with incentives for participating in health-related activities such as like health fairs, fitness challenges and healthy eating campaigns. Additionally, some agencies provide on-site fitness centers or discounted memberships to local gyms. Take advantage of these programs in 2024 to improve your health and potentially lower your healthcare costs.
  • Catch-up contributions: If you’re 50 or older (or will be turning 50 in 2024), you can make additional contributions to your Thrift Savings Plan (TSP) beyond the annual limit. The 2024 IRS annual limit for Catch-up contributions is $7,500. This amount is in addition to the regular TSP limit of $23,000. If you started late or had career gaps, use this option to boost your retirement savings.
  • Long-Term Care Insurance: The Federal Long-Term Care Insurance Program (FLTCIP) is currently suspended and they’re not accepting new applications. Eligible individuals who applied for FLTCIP prior to the start of the suspension period will have their application considered. If the application is approved for coverage, then the individual will receive a benefit booklet and schedule of benefits with complete coverage information.
  • Life insurance: Employees under age 65 who retired on or after January 1, 1990, must continue to make contributions toward their basic life insurance coverage. For 2024, budget authority and obligations will increase by $2.0 million due to the number of annuitants under age 65 with Federal Employees’ Group Life Insurance coverage. Funds appropriated to this account remain available until expended to finance post-retirement life insurance benefits.
  • COLA: Starting at 62, Federal Employees Retirement System (FERS) retirees are eligible for COLA. For 2024, annuitants who retire under FERS will receive a 2.2 percent increase. The rate varies each year.
  • Retirement planning: Utilize resources from your agency and organizations like the Office of Personnel Management to create a personalized retirement plan. Consider factors like desired retirement age, anticipated expenses and potential sources of income—any survivor benefits and decisions made in retirement exceptionally impact retirement and future benefits. Factors to consider are your retirement planning, with or without a survivor, life insurance and other benefits.
  • Survivor benefits and retirement: Protect your loved ones by designating beneficiaries for your TSP and life insurance policies. If you retire under FERS, the maximum survivor benefit payable is 50 percent of your unreduced annual benefit.

Tips for Optimal Utilization of Federal and Retirement Benefits

Outside of the open season, when federal employees can change their benefit options, there are meaningful ways federal employees can optimize their utilization of federal and retirement benefits to improve their current situation.

One of the ways is to make changes to your benefits when applicable. For example, if you have any life change—including loss of coverage, adoption, birth, marriage, divorce, death or a move—you can change your benefits. This may trigger other updates like changing your insurance or beneficiaries. Also, it’s a good time to revisit your financial outlook so you can make any necessary updates based on your changes.

Another approach is to understand every component of retirement income and TSP options. This includes maxing out your TSP contributions, especially if you’re eligible for agency matching contributions. This significantly increases your retirement savings. Finding the solution that best meets your needs should be customized to fit your specific goals.

Finally, keeping updatedabout your benefits and retirement options is crucial for financial security and planning for your future. Understanding key information and actively managing your benefits and retirement plans can ensure a comfortable and secure future after your government service.

Financial Planning and Career Development Resources

FEW offers various programs and resources focused on career development and leadership training. The organization also provides workshops, webinars and conferences on topics like financial planning, work-life balance and stress management. Premiere training on the national, regional and chapter levels are just some of the paybacks of FEW membership. 

Get in touch to learn more. We’d love to hear from you.

Nicole Sherwood is a licensed health and life insurance agent with United Benefits, which works alongside federal employees to provide and design solutions that fit an individual or family’s needs. Sherwood specializes in Medicare, benefits, and retirement for federal employees and retirees. Before working in insurance, she worked in finance for one of the top 25 children’s hospitals and several Fortune 500 companies.

Exceeding Expectations: How FEW’s National Training Program Helped Tiffany Groves Reconnect with Dormant Skills

When I attended my second FEW National Training Program (NTP) during the summer of 2023, I did not anticipate connecting with a community of professional women who would be genuinely interested in uplifting me as I sought to further my career. I have enjoyed several conferences in the past hosted by various organizations, however I never felt impacted by my attendance. I typically walked away with great refreshers of information that were not new to me, or best practices that did not necessarily fit my organization’s way of doing business.

As the Acting Senior Advisor of Recruitment and outreach at the Food and Drug Administration (FDA), Office of Digital Transformation, one of my responsibilities is to attract new staff members and foster diversity. I attended FEW’s NTP to network, learn more about the challenges women were facing in the federal government as well as explore the booths of other agencies that were recruiting for new hires.   

I met Stacey St. Holder, Special Assistant to the President for Mentoring, during a professional networking class. This led to an informational interview once we returned home to the Washington DC area. I discussed my current position at the FDA as well as my background in communications which includes a Master of Arts degree in Public Communication, experience in public relations at Fort Hood in Killeen, Texas, and providing communications services as a federal contractor. When I mentioned my interest in more fully leveraging my skillset, Ms. St. Holder offered to connect me with the National Communications Chair Ivana Miranda.

My conversation with Ms. Miranda blossomed into a beautiful and productive professional partnership. Together, we mapped out a shadowing process where I began developing weekly content for FEW’s social media pages. Ms. Miranda offered constructive feedback while I tailored the drafts. As the weeks went by, I have taken the initiative to develop even more content and offer creative recommendations. I also coordinated a guest interview and co-hosted an episode of the LEAP with FEW podcast. My experience volunteering as a marketing specialist for FEW has been very educational as I became more familiar with writing for social media platforms, staying abreast of FEW activities, and becoming better acquainted with the easily accessible resources that federal agencies produce to foster their various missions.       Ms. Miranda has proven to be a tremendous teacher and supporter.

One of the things that I hoped to gain by attending the NTP was making connections with women outside of the FDA, to gain a different perspective on navigating the professional federal landscape. That goal was achieved in spades. Now that I am a FEW member and active participant, I look forward to becoming more engaged with my local chapter.     

If you are looking for sign to join FEW – this is it! FEW lives up to its mission of helping women grow professionally in a real and meaningful way. For more information about FEW membership, contact membershipVP@few.org.

If you are interested in contributing to FEW’s communications efforts to deliver timely, clear, and engaging content to its members, please contact communications@few.org

Five Fun Facts about Tiffany:

  1. She’s a native New Orleanian and graduate of Louisiana State University.
  2. She enjoys volunteering and giving back, whether facilitating college success and career planning classes or mentoring a public-school student.
  3. Tiffany loves to travel abroad and seeks to learn about the history and local culture of the places she visits.  
  4. She’s a certified project manager and trained facilitator who loves strategizing and planning.
  5. An article she wrote for Urban Sentinel magazine about learning from difficult situations was published in the December 22/January 2023 issue. 

SUICIDE PREVENTION: Change the Conversation

Kamara Gardner, MPH
Public & Mental Health Advocate
Suicide Prevention Subject Matter Expert

Young Government Leaders (YGL) member, Kamara Gardner, encourages FEW and YGL to educate ourselves and each other about suicide prevention.

The National Action Alliance for Suicide Prevention developed a safety framework for messaging that aims to change the conversation around suicide and promote help-seeking and resiliency.

Here are some “Dos” and “Don’ts” to facilitate constructive public communication about suicide.

DO

  • Learn the warning signs
  • Say “died by suicide” or “suicide attempt”
  • Be direct, nonjudgmental, and open minded in conversations about suicide
  • Provide accurate information about where to seek help, educate on suicide prevention, write about coping mechanisms
  • Show compassion, actively listen, and accept one’s feelings

DON’T

  • Glamorize or romanticize suicide
  • Say “committed suicide,” “successful suicide attempt,” “complete suicide”
  • Provide details about suicide method or location
  • Continuously repeat coverage
  • Use oversimplified explanations for suicide
  • Offer personal details that encourage identification of the person who died by suicide
  • Reinforce negative stereotypes related to mental illness

Let’s change the conversation and promote a supportive and understanding environment. #SuicidePrevention #MessagingMatters

Resources:

FEW NTP 2023: Process Improvements Boost Productivity

Streamlining the procurement process could save the Federal government billions.

But that’s not the only process that could use improvement. There are thousands of processes among various agencies that could use a second look.

Cynthia D. Dunn,Director of the Tax Exempt and Government Entities (TE/GE), Office of Equity, Diversity and Inclusion (EDI) at the Internal Revenue Service, will teach “Process Improvement: Identify, Analyze, and Improve” on Tuesday, 7/11, 1:15 – 2:30 P.M. at Federally Employed Women’s (FEW) National Training Program (NTP) in Columbus, Ohio, scheduled for July 10-14. The training benefits will include: 1. Understand barriers that may interfere and how to overcome them. 2. Learn the benefits of Process Improvement and 3. Walk away with ideas to incorporate into your organization to eliminate waste and implement a continuous process improvement plan.

FEW’s NTP offers more than 110 classes in five tracks that include professional development, office technology and administration, leadership and culture, employee experience, as well as mindfulness and wellness. All courses align with the Office of Personnel Management (OPM) Executive Core Competencies (i.e., leading people, leading change, business acumen, result driven and building coalitions).

Register today for training in the Office Technology and Administration education track:

Evolution of Cybersecurity and Data Analytics in Today’s Workforce. Monday, 7/10, 10:00 – 11:30 A.M. Register Today—only 40 seats. (Not a member yet? Click here.) Join us for a discussion as we explore the fundamentals of cybersecurity and data analytics. We will discuss how these two career paths intersect and answer questions about when, or if, it is too late to change your career and whether or not you have the right skillset. What else might you need to be successful in these areas? We hope you will join us to find out! Instructor Dr. Lutheria “Lu” Peters, PhD, MS, MPH, CSPO, CSM, of ODEEO/Affirmative Employment Division will lead the training. (Office Technology and Administration 1104)

Adaptability: A Leader’s Guide to Pivoting with Grace and Helping Others Do the Same. Monday, 7/10, 2:45 – 4:00 P.M. Register Today—only 40 seats. (Not a member yet? Click here.) Leaders who struggle with change or refuse to adapt to new ways of thinking, doing and being are in for a rude surprise and a lot of trouble. The more rapid the pace of change, the direr the consequences of stubbornly sticking to old ways. Like most things in business (and in life), change is a two-edged sword—a threat and an opportunity. Leaders who adapt to rapid change better than their peers very often are able to achieve great things, while leaders who ignore changing circumstances or struggle to “go with the flow” can expect to go the way of the dinosaur. Adapting may be difficult, but it is not impossible. Learn how to overcome your (and other’s) resistance to change to become a more flexible, resilient and successful leader. Instructor Glorimar Maldonado, Diversity Officer, U.S. Patent and Trademark Office, U.S. Department of Commerce, will lead the training. (Office Technology and Administration 1101)

Impactful Presentation Skills. Monday, 7/10, 4:15 – 5:15 P.M. Register Today—only 40 seats. (Not a member yet? Click here.) “Do you want to pursue better communication skills with your vendors, colleagues, and your boss(es)? Do you feel that your presentation skills are lacking and need to improve them for the next project you are assigned? At the root of it…do you still feel unsure about what you are doing when you need to project confidence and be able to accomplish what you have been tasked with? More than ever before, there is a need for good presenters who can not only engage an audience, but provide better communication, whether it is written or verbal. In this session, you will learn to: 1. Discover strategies that translate into your project management, teamwork, and leadership skills in a wide-ranging variety of scenarios; 2. Cultivate a working framework through mind exercises and practice changing old-style habits into high-performing activities; and 3. Create more confidence overall in your daily activities, translating into more personal and professional reward.” Distinguished Toastmaster Joshua D. Smith will lead the training. (Office Technology and Administration 1105)

Data Analysis Using Excel. Tuesday, 7/11, 8:00 – 9:15 A.M. Register Today—only 40 seats. (Not a member yet? Click here.) One of the most widely used programs for carrying out statistical examination is Microsoft Excel. Because they come with pivot tables that are built in, they are without a doubt the most in-demand analytical tool that is currently available. You can easily import, explore, clean, analyze, and visualize your data with this all-in- one data management software. It also allows you to explore and clean your data. In this piece, we will go over the various approaches to data analysis that can be carried out in Excel. In this session you will learn how to utilize data analysis in excel. Dr. Lutheria “Lu” Peters, PhD, MS, MPH, CSPO, CSM, of ODEEO/Affirmative Employment Division will lead the training. (Office Technology and Administration 1102)

Maximize Your Minutes: The Value of Time Management. Tuesday, 7/11, 11:00 A.M. – 12:00 P.M. Register Today—only 40 seats. (Not a member yet? Click here.) Effective time management involves discipline and making good choices about the way you spend your time. In this session, we will identify ways to increase your time’s value and stay focused on key priorities. Beneatha Barkley, MBA, Director of Strategic Partnerships at Southern New Hampshire University, will lead the training. (Office Technology and Administration 1113)

Data Visualization: Infographics. Wednesday, 7/12, 9:30 – 10:45 A.M. Register Today—only 40 seats. (Not a member yet? Click here.) This session assists professionals in achieving success in environments where Big Data and metrics are critical. We will discuss information design, data analytics and filtering, best practices in visualization, and programming basics taught by industry experts enable you to bring complex statistics to life for a wide range of audiences. Instructor Dr. Lutheria “Lu” Peters, PhD, MS, MPH, CSPO, CSM, of ODEEO/Affirmative Employment Division will lead the training. (Office Technology and Administration 1103)

Implicit Bias: Conscious Decision Maker. Tuesday, 7/11, 9:30 – 10:45 A.M. Register Today—only 36 seats. (Not a member yet? Click here.) Become aware of your inner storyteller. We must understand that in the absence of details our unconscious minds will fill in the gaps with information based on our life experiences. In this session, participants will learn that we all have an inner storyteller (aka biases) that should not be viewed as good or bad. We just need to become more conscious of the story that is being told is still relevant, helpful, and positive. The training will deliver five key takeaways: 1) Discover what Implicit Bias entails, 2) Understand various types of biases, 3) Break down biases to understand how they show up in the workplace, community and home, 4) The effects of implicit bias on self and others, and 5) How to address implicit bias as an individual and organization as a whole. Kenston Henderson Sr., Founder and CEO, Live With Lyfe, LLC, will lead the training. (Office Technology and Administration 1312)

TSP Pre-Separation. Wednesday, 7/12, 1:15 – 2:30 P.M. Register Today—only 40 seats. (Not a member yet? Click here.) This course is designed to give late-career participants the tools they need to make smart decisions with their TSP savings as they prepare to retire. The agenda includes the TSP distributions, death benefits and other separation concerns regarding their TSP account. This is a 2½-hour session. Instructor Arvella Collins, who is a TSP Training & Liaison Specialist at the Federal Retirement Thrift Investment Board, will lead the training. (Office Technology and Administration 1107)

TSP Early to Mid-Career. Wednesday, 7/12, 2:45 – 4:00 P.M. Register Today—only 40 seats. (Not a member yet? Click here.) This webinar focuses on what early and mid-career employees and service members can do to take full advantage of the TSP. You’ll learn how TSP contributions work, the difference between traditional and Roth contributions, and how to manage your TSP account throughout your career. This is a 2½-hour session. Instructor Arvella Collins, who is a TSP Training & Liaison Specialist at the Federal Retirement Thrift Investment Board, will lead the training. (Office Technology and Administration 1108)

FEW helps more than one million women in the military and civilian workforce become strategic leaders with its four-pillar program: training, legislation, diversity, and compliance. Since 1968, the nonprofit has advocated for equity and diversity for women. FEW works toward advancing women in the government with cutting-edge training, nationwide networking, and invaluable insight. For more information, please visit FEW.org.

Mindfulness & Wellness: A Sense of Life Control

Focusing on the present can have a positive impact on our wellbeing.

Mindfulness can reduce anxiety and depression, lower blood pressure, and improve sleep.

In a world that often feels out of control, there is an increased movement toward mindfulness.

Dr. Camille Tatum Jones, PMP, LMSW, CEAP, will lead a series of training classes on mindfulness and wellbeing during Federally Employed Women’s (FEW) National Training Program (NTP) on July 10-14 in Columbus, Ohio.

FEW’s NTP offers more than 110 classes in five tracks that include professional development, office technology and administration, leadership and culture, employee experience, as well as mindfulness and wellness. All courses align with the Office of Personnel Management (OPM) Executive Core Competencies (i.e. leading people, leading change, business acumen, result driven and building coalitions).

Dr. Tatum Jones is a recognized behavioral scientist in the Washington, D.C., metropolitan area whose cross-over aptitude allows her to be both an individual and organizational transformation change agent. This mediator, author, coach, facilitator, interventionist and engagement specialist oversees a flagship Federal Occupational Health and Work/life balance program where she has become a standout corporate cultural transformation advisor and advocate for wellness in the workplace via Employee Assistance Programming.

Register today for the mindfulness and wellbeing courses with Dr. Jones:

  • A Sense of Life Control – Knowing your Emotional Wellbeing. Tuesday, 7/11, 11:00 A.M. – 12:00 P.M. Register Today—only 40 seats. (Not a member yet? Click here.) With the many life changes in the past few years, it has been more important to know your emotional wellbeing. This panel will cover subjects around the idea of emotional wellbeing, including mindfulness, social connections, networking and support, spiritual and environmental factors. We will also explore the importance of resilience and laughter in today’s world. (Mindfulness and Wellbeing 1502)
  • Mental Fitness: Healthy Thinking in the Workplace. Tuesday, 7/11, 4:15 – 5:15 P.M. Register Today—only 40 seats. (Not a member yet? Click here.) Today, employers across all industries are encouraged to consider mental fitness as much as physical fitness when designing an employee benefits plan. As the COVID-19 pandemic showed, mental fitness is just as important as physical fitness. This session will show some ways to protect your employees’ mental health in difficult times. (Mindfulness and Wellbeing 1503)

FEW helps more than one million women in the military and civilian workforce become strategic leaders with its four-pillar program: training, legislation, diversity, and compliance. Since 1968, the nonprofit has advocated for equity and diversity for women. FEW works toward advancing women in the government with cutting-edge training, nationwide networking, and invaluable insight. For more information, please visit FEW.org.

NTP Leadership Track: Powerplay Pivots Work

True leaders don’t panic—they pivot.

Pia Scott, a Senior Advisor at the U.S. General Services Administration (GSA), will address the topic of leadership resiliency during the Federally Employed Women’s (FEW) National Training Program (NTP) in Columbus, Ohio from July 10-14.

With her expertise in change management and human capital, Scott will lead  the workshop— Resilience: The Power of the Pivotthat informs participants about the importance of bouncing back quickly from failure. This experience will be an insightful, interactive, and fun workshop teaching participants strategic and tactical approaches to leveraging failure. Three major highlights in the workshop will include self-awareness, self-acceptance and self-actualization.

Resilience: The Power of the Pivot will be held Monday, July 10 from 1:00-2:30 P.M. Register Today because only 40 seats are available. (Not a member? Click here.)

Pia Scott is a self-proclaimed “Innovation Visioneer”. A former Presidential Management Fellow, American Council for Technology-Industry Advisory Council (ACT-IAC) Partners Fellow, and Chief of Staff of the Presidential Transition Support Team, Scott leads cross-functional high-performing teams and cultivates synergistic partnerships across Government and industry to create elegant solutions. Her entrepreneurial spirit and focus on what really matters empowers, inspires, and motivates people to achieve the seemingly impossible.

FEW’s NTP offers more than 110 classes in five tracks that include professional development, office technology and administration, leadership and culture, employee experience, as well as mindfulness and wellness. All courses align with the Office of Personnel Management (OPM) Executive Core Competencies (i.e., leading people, leading change, business acumen, result driven and building coalitions).

Also register today for other courses in the Leadership and Culture track:

  • Leadership Versus Management. Monday, 7/10 from 10:00-11:30 A.M. Register Today—only 40 seats. (Not a member yet? Click here.) This leadership training course is designed to help leaders-to-be get ready for their new challenges and responsibilities. Attendees will discover the heart, soul and mind of true leadership and explore leadership roles as strategist, change agent, coach, manager, communicator, mentor and team member. (Leadership and Culture 1305)
  • Organizational Excellence – Lead with Passion, Power and Purpose. Monday, 7/10 from 10-11:30 A.M. Register Today—only 36 seats. (Not a member yet? Click here.) This highly interactive course taps into organizational excellence, best practices found in positive psychology research. The material will be shared in an engaging, story-based, information packed session. This course is designed to inspire, challenge, and ignite the desire for self- improvement, contribute in new and innovative ways, facilitate change, increase organizational effectiveness, and cultivate an environment where inspiration, creativity and people flourish. (Leadership and Culture 1316)
  • Creating a Conflict Management/Conflict Resolution Culture. Tuesday, 7/11 from 8:00-9:15 A.M. Register Today—only 40 seats. (Not a member yet? Click here.) Receiving informal and formal feedback is amazing. It can be structured to provide effective and lasting impacts on your work. This session will help participants learn why the way we deliver feedback is important. Effective communication skills are a way to improve morale, have clear expectations and improve performance. Benefits will include: 1) how to deliver a message that people can accept, 2) how to accept offered feedback in return, 3) learn ways to handle negative conflict while giving feedback, and 4) learn how to use these skills to give and receive effective feedback in person and in a virtual work environment. (Leadership and Culture 1301)
  • Leveraging Diversity in the Workplace. Tuesday, 7/11 from 8:00-9:15 A.M. Register Today—only 40 seats. (Not a member yet? Click here.) It’s crucial for any organization to maximize the variety of perspectives, experiences and skills that people bring to their workplaces to increase productivity and performance. But bringing people together from various backgrounds presents both great opportunities and some difficulties for organizations. In this session, we’ll talk about how organizations can gain from fresh viewpoints if they can bring people together around a shared set of principles and objectives. (Leadership and Culture 1303)
  • Leader Self-Care: Avoid Burnout, Increase Productivity, and Integrate Work- Life. Tuesday, 7/11 from 11:00 A.M. – 12 P.M. Register Today—only 40 seats. (Not a member yet? Click here.) Many leaders remain resistant to the whole idea of self-care, no matter how beneficial it may be. Resistance often originates from feeling that self-care is a sign of weakness, there just isn’t enough time in the day, it’s selfish to take time out, or the whole concept is too “new age-y” for them. The reality is that leaders who actively practice healthy work-life integration and balance and take time to refresh themselves are more innovative, focused and productive than their counterparts who refuse to step away from the desk. Learn how to identify the signs of impending burnout and how the concept of self-care can work in your favor to make you a better, stronger leader and an example to those who follow you. Moreover, discover concrete strategies to incorporate simple self-care practices into your daily routine. (Leadership and Culture 1304)
  • Integrity-Based Leadership. Wednesday, 7/12 from 8:00-9:15 A.M. Register Today—only 40 seats. (Not a member yet? Click here.) Dr. Sherrie Johnson will discuss the importance of being an authentic leader in the workplace. An authentic leader is open, honest, transparent and communicates well with employees. Being an authentic leader creates better employee job performance. She will also discuss research on authentic leadership in the workplace. (Leadership and Culture 1318)
  • Importance of Communication in Leadership. Wednesday, 7/12 from 9:30-10:45 A.M. Register Today—only 40 seats. (Not a member yet? Click here.) The training will discuss the importance of leaders communicating effectively with employees and providing ways to accomplish this goal. The training will also discuss effective ways to communicate. The course will cover several scenarios as well as a question-and-answer session. (Leadership and Culture 1327)
  • Leading a Multi-Generational Workforce in Times of Change. Wednesday, 7/12 from 11:00 A.M. – 12 P.M. Register Today—only 36 seats. (Not a member yet? Click here.) Leading teams in an organization in the best of times can be a challenge; having members of five generations does not make the job any easier. From leading teams to developing individual contributors, how are organizations maximizing their talent base? In this lively interactive discussion, our panelists will share challenges and best practices their organizations use to create leadership opportunities for a multi-generational workforce. (Leadership and Culture 1306)
  • Ethical Leadership. Wednesday, 7/12 from 1:15-2:30 P.M. Register Today—only 40 seats. (Not a member yet? Click here.) The training will discuss the importance of being an ethical leader and the pitfalls when there is a lack of respect for leadership. The course will explore scenarios from research and interviews with employees. There will also be a question-and-answer session. (Leadership & Culture 1307)
  • Leadership Agility. Thursday, 7/13 from 8:00–11 A.M. Register Today—only 40 seats. (Not a member yet? Click here.) Leadership agility is the ability to take effective action in complex and rapidly changing conditions. This concept is introduced and developed to teach leaders core focus areas and specific skills to be more effective in today’s dynamic work environment with increasingly diverse employees. The six core skills increase participants’: 1) capacity to inspire others, 2) ability to provide feedback and coach to desired outcomes, 3) ability to flex behavior based on the needs of others, 4) capacity to deal with conflict, 5) ability to operate outside of personal preferences, and 6) ability to identify and assess performance. (Leadership & Culture 1324)

FEW helps more than one million women in the military and civilian workforce become strategic leaders with its four-pillar program: training, legislation, diversity, and compliance. Since 1968, the nonprofit has advocated for equity and diversity for women. FEW works toward advancing women in the government with cutting-edge training, nationwide networking, and invaluable insight. For more information, please visit FEW.org.

NTP 2023: Lean Six Sigma Reduces Waste

How can Federal agencies and other organizations reduce and eliminate waste? How can these same organizations increase efficiencies to promote innovation and growth? According to Forbes Magazine and American Transparency: Open the Books, the Government wasted almost $33 million between 2017-2019. The Festivus Report 2022 paints a grimmer picture, citing more than $482 billion in Government waste.

Sheryl Vogt, President of Vogt Consulting Inc., has the solution to address the issue of waste while improving productivity for all our organizations. Vogt will instruct Project Managers, Supervisors, Data Analysts, and others interested in learning how to implement process improvement into their everyday work.

Vogt will teach a three-part Lean Six Sigma Series at Federally Employed Women’s (FEW) National Training Program (NTP) in Columbus, Ohio, on July 10-14. She has more than 24 years of hands-on experience in quality and engineering and 17 years of Lean Six Sigma experience. Vogt was a Master Black Belt of Six Sigma at the General Electric Company before starting her consulting company.

Interested participants and managers who want to learn more about the practical application of Lean Six Sigma may look no further than the public interest story about logistics specialist, Kevin Joyce, who saved the U.S. Army almost $10 million over five years. When Joyce scrutinized how computers were reset within Army Warfighter Information Network Tactical units, he saw how the U.S. Army could save money by doing the work themselves. “I knew the cost savings would be big, but I didn’t know it would be that big,” said Joyce, who came up with the idea as part of a Lean Six Sigma project. “It was expensive to ship the computers out and have a contractor reset and clean the laptops, but it also brought equipment accountability back to the unit.”

FEW’s NTP offers more than 110 classes in five tracks that include professional development, office technology and administration, leadership and culture, employee experience, as well as mindfulness and wellness. All courses align with the Office of Personnel Management (OPM) Executive Core Competencies (i.e., leading people, leading change, business acumen, result driven and building coalitions).

Register today for the Lean Six Sigma courses with Vogt:

  • Lean Six Sigma Course 1 – Introduction to Lean Six Sigma and Waste Identification. Monday, 7/10 from 1:00- 4:00 P.M. Register today—only 40 seats. Not a member? Click here.) This introductory course provides an overview of Lean Six Sigma, explains the five phases of a Six Sigma Project and introduces a quick tool that can be used to start identifying opportunities for process improvement. Participants will: 1) be introduced to Lean Six Sigma and understand the common language used, 2) learn a tool for starting process improvement in their organization and 3) actively practice identifying opportunities for Process Improvement. (Professional Development 1222)
  • Lean Six Sigma Course 2 – Using Voice of the Customer to Define Problem Statements. Tuesday, 7/11 from 1:00-4:00 P.M. Register today—only 40 seats. (Not a member? Click here.) This course is a follow-up to Introduction to Lean Six Sigma and Waste Identification. It will delve more deeply into the key tools for understanding customer requirements and scoping Lean Six Sigma projects to meet them. Participants will:         1) gain an overview on collecting and using Voice of the Customer, 2) learn tips and tools to collect and use Voice of the Customer to craft a problem statement, and 3) practice creating a plan for collecting and translating Voice of the Customer. (Professional Development 1223)
  • Lean Six Sigma Course 3 – Using Process Maps in Lean Six Sigma. Wednesday, 7/12 from 1:00-4:00 P.M. Register today—only 40 seats. (Not a member? Click here.) This course builds on the first two LSS Courses and takes the first step in a Lean Six Sigma project by using process maps to understand the current situation and identify root cause issues. Key questions and tips will be shared to ensure the process map is used correctly to guide the process improvement team. Participants will: 1) gain an overview of the uses of process maps, 2) learn tips and tools to build a process map to understand current situations and issues and 3) practice creating a process map. (Professional Development 1224)

FEW helps more than one million women in the military and civilian workforce become strategic leaders with its four-pillar program: training, legislation, diversity, and compliance. Since 1968, the nonprofit has advocated for equity and diversity for women. FEW works toward advancing women in the government with cutting-edge training, nationwide networking and invaluable insight. For more information, please visit FEW.org.

‘Leveling Up For Success’: Power Communications Rules

Communication between genders is fraught with difficulty.

Communication methods must be both intelligent and adaptable for the high-stakes games of senior management. As part of the Leveling Up for Success Training Series, Angela Kochuba, Managing Director with the Federal Training Academy, will facilitate Leveling Up for Success Training Series; Session II – The Importance of Powerful Communicationat the Federally Employed Women’s (FEW) annual National Training Program (NTP) in Columbus, Ohio, on      July 10-14.

This practical and insightful training, based on research and the experiences of working people, explains the fundamental distinctions between the ways men and women think. It also examines how men and women differently convey job dedication, management experience, leadership, and other promotion-related skills.

Leveling Up for Success Training Series; Session II – The Importance of Powerful Communication will be held Monday, July 10 from 2:45-4:00 P.M.  Register today; 36 seats are available. (Not a member yet? Click here.)

FEW’s NTP offers more than 110 classes in five tracks that include professional development, office technology and administration, leadership and culture, employee experience, and mindfulness and wellness. All courses align with the Office of Personnel Management (OPM) Executive Core Competencies (i.e., leading people, leading change, business acumen, result driven and building coalitions).

Register today for other Leveling Up for Success Training Series sessions:

  • Maintaining an Inclusive Culture in the Modern Workforce. Monday, 7/10 from 1:00-2:15 P.M. Register Today—only 36 seats. (Not a member yet? Click here.) Pandemic and economic shutdowns have made working from home widespread. Overall, 22% of Americans will work remotely by 2025, an Upwork study says. After all the progress enterprises have made to adapt to remote work and the technological advantages tech startups have, you may expect an easy transition. Many companies struggle to sustain an inclusive work-from-home culture. Lack of diversity and cultural knowledge can create toxic work environments, even remotely. Employers, HR professionals, and remote teams must promote diversity and maintain a healthy culture. Tech, engineering, and similar businesses are growing. (Professional Development 1701)
  • The Importance of Being Resilient and Taking Strategic Risks. Tuesday, 7/11 from 9:30-10:45 A.M. Register today—only 40 seats. (Not a member yet? Click here.) As to why some women achieve well in their careers while others are passed over for promotions, think about the following. The inability to bounce back from setbacks and the fear of failure are common explanations. Learning how to “bounce back” from setbacks and being more confident taking calculated risks are particularly vital for women. Fortunately, the ability to view setbacks as opportunities for development and to maximize one’s leadership strengths are both teachable. In this session, you will learn effective strategies for rethinking ambiguity, embracing healthy conflict, adjusting to difficult circumstances and stepping outside of your comfort zone to pursue novel avenues of professional growth. (Professional Development 1703)
  • The Influence of Allies on the Development of an Inclusive Culture. Tuesday, 7/11 from 1:15-2:30 P.M. Register today—only 36 seats. (Not a member yet? Click here.) An ally is someone who takes the time to learn about diversity and inclusion issues, who actively seeks common ground with others and who provides support to members of marginalized communities. Organizational allies are crucial to the success of diversity and inclusion programs because of the positive impact they can have on the success rate of those programs. They take action when they witness discrimination and stand by those who are marginalized and could need their help. There is a need for all members of your organization to be allies who work to create a community where everyone feels safe, respected, valued and accepted. (Professional Development 1704)
  • Connecting in a New Reality Using Strategic Networking.  Tuesday, 7/11 from 2:45-  4:00 P.M. Register today—only 40 seats. (Not a member yet? Click here.) As a result of recent events, professionals are in a “wait and see” frame of mind as they adapt to new work situations. This, of course, also causes a substantial amount of lingering unsuitability. This webinar, created for working professionals who wish to find a way out of their current rut, explores innovative strategies for building professional relationships in the face of challenging market conditions. If you want to be a more effective leader, you’ll learn how to increase your agility and embrace strategic networking. You will learn about new success factors, methods for stretching your comfort zone and other useful techniques. (Professional Development 1705)
  • Maintaining Team Resilience Through Change & Uncertainty. Wednesday, 7/12 from 9:30-10:45 A.M. Register today—only 36 seats. (Not a member yet? Click here.) How are you managing during these uncertain times? Join us for an interactive overview of personal resilience concepts, strategies and tools to help manage stress. This session will provide an opportunity to share some of the concerns and challenges we are all facing and learn how we can strengthen both personal and team resilience. Take a Personal Resilience Inventory and follow a Daily Resilience Countdown. Learn ways to Rest Your Brain and build your resilience during times of stress and uncertainty. Benefits: 1. Gain an overview of personal resilience concepts and how they impact managing stress and performance. 2. Identify the five factors of resilience. 3. Learn strategies to strengthen both personal and team resilience. (Professional Development 1706)
  • Creating a Meaningful Mentoring Partnership: G.R.O.W. Wednesday, 7/12 from 1:15- 2:30 P.M. Register today—only 36 seats. (Not a member yet? Click here.) Finding someone at work who will support, encourage and challenge you is one of the best ways to advance your career and develop your skills. Typically, this type of relationship involves mentoring. The advantages of having a mentor have been extensively documented. To reap the benefits of mentorship for oneself or one’s organization, the mentor-mentee relationship is crucial. This training will explore how to create effective and meaningful mentor relationships using the G.R.O.W. (Goal), Current Reality, Options (or Obstacles), Will (or Way Forward) model and how it helps define the goals for the mentor-mentee relationship. (Professional Development 1707)

FEW helps more than one million women in the military and civilian workforce become strategic leaders with its four-pillar program: training, legislation, diversity, and compliance. Since 1968, the nonprofit has advocated for equity and diversity for women. FEW works toward advancing women in government with cutting-edge training, nationwide networking and invaluable insight. For more information, please visit FEW.org.