To build jQuery, you need to have the latest Node.js/npm and git 1.7 or later. Earlier versions might work, but are not supported. For Windows, you have to download and install git and Node.js. OS X users should install Homebrew. Once Homebrew is installed, run brew install git to install git, and brew install node to install Node.js. Linux/BSD users should use their appropriate package managers to install git and Node.js, or build from source if you swing that way. Easy-peasy. Special builds can be created that exclude subsets of jQuery functionality. This allows for smaller custom builds when the builder is certain that those parts of jQuery are not being used. For example, an app that only used JSONP for $.ajax() and did not need to calculate offsets or positions of elements could exclude the offset and ajax/xhr modules. Any module may be excluded except for core, and selector. To exclude a module, pass its path relative to the src folder (without the .js extension). Some example modules that can be excluded are: Note: Excluding Sizzle will also exclude all jQuery selector extensions (such as effects/animatedSelector and css/hiddenVisibleSelectors). The build process shows a message for each dependent module it excludes or includes. As an option, you can set the module name for jQuery's AMD definition. By default, it is set to "jquery", which plays nicely with plugins and third-party libraries, but there may be cases where you'd like to change this. Simply set the "amd" option: For questions or requests regarding custom builds, please start a thread on the Developing jQuery Core section of the forum. Due to the combinatorics and custom nature of these builds, they are not regularly tested in jQuery's unit test process. The non-Sizzle selector engine currently does not pass unit tests because it is missing too much essential functionality.

Federally Employed Women Recognizes National Disability Employment Awareness Month

National Disability Employment Awareness Month graphic

October is National Disability Employment Awareness Month and all members are encouraged to participate in the observance.  The 2018 theme is, “America’s Workforce: Empowering All.”

Workplaces welcoming the talents of all people, including people with disabilities, are a critical part of our efforts to build an inclusive community and strong economy. In this spirit, Federally Employed Women (FEW) recognizes National Disability Employment Awareness Month this October to raise awareness about disability employment issues and celebrate the many and varied contributions of people with disabilities.  Activities during this month will reinforce the value and talent people with disabilities add to our workplaces and communities and affirm FEW’s commitment to an inclusive organization.

The purpose of National Disability Employment Awareness Month is to educate about disability employment issues and celebrate the many and varied contributions of America’s workers with disabilities.  National Disability Employment Awareness Month began in 1945, when Congress declared the first week in October each year “National Employ the Physically Handicapped Week.”  In 1962, the word “physically” was dropped to acknowledge individuals with all types of disabilities.  Then in 1988, Congress expanded the week to a month and changed the name to National Disability Employment Awareness Month. Held annually, National Disability Employment Awareness Month is led by the U.S. Department of Labor’s Office of Disability Employment Policy, but its true spirit lies in the many observances held at the grassroots level across the nation every year.

For specific ideas about how FEW members can support National Disability Employment Awareness Month, you can visit www.dol.gov/ndeam or email the FEW Special Assistant for People with Disabilities at disbilities@few.org.  Suggestions range from simple, such as putting up a poster, to comprehensive, such as implementing a disability education program.  Regardless, all play an important part in fostering a more inclusive workforce, one where every person is recognized for his or her abilities — every day of every month.

Karen Rainey, President